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Quiz: How Many of these Endangered Mammals are Left?

Sunday, 29 March 2015

Fifteen species, fifteen multiple choice questions. Yet how many of each species do you think still exists in the wild? 

If the answer you choose goes GREEN, then you got it right.  If it goes RED then you got it wrong.  You will also see how many others chose the different answers (in terms of a percentage).



Would you like to do another quiz?

If this quiz has left you a little depressed (the numbers of some of the species are of massive concern to everyone, after all, then try a quiz which, it is hoped, can only raise the spirits.  Fifteen big cats and wild cats are involved - but can you guess the species? Click here or on the picture to do the quiz.

Image Credits
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

The Holy Rats of Karni Mata

From the outside the Hindu temple of Karni Mata in the small town of Deshnoke in the Indian province of Rajasthan looks much like any other. Ornate and beautiful and with a steady stream of worshippers arriving it holds a surprise for the unsuspecting visitor.

The temple is inhabited by rats: thousands of them.

The Brown Bear: King of the Nordic Forests


This short film by Chris Schmid strives to highlight the wild brown bears, it is the result of filming in remote locations in Finland over a couple of days.

While the brown bear's range has shrunk and it has faced local extinctions, it remains listed as a least concern species by the IUCN with a total population of approximately 200,000.

How Does a Hermit Crab Change Shells? In the Most Remarkable Way!


Hermit crabs use sea shells as their homes but as the crab grows they need to move on and move up the property ladder.  You might think that they simply find a bigger shell and slip in to that but the process can be rather more extraordinary.

As humans we often form chains in order for many people to move at once.  It is the same for the hermit crab with a number of crabs lining up to exchange – in strict order of size.  Of course the odd bit of gazumping goes on, as you can see in this fascinating footage narrated by David Attenborough.

Penguin the Magpie and Noah take an Outdoor Shower


Photographer Cameron Bloom’s son Noah rescued a magpie when it was a chick.  Since then, although the appropriately (more or less) named Penguin is as free as a bird (ahem) it keeps coming back to re-engage with its adopted family.  Here Noah (an even more appropriate name, perhaps!) and Penguin take an outdoor shower together on a hot summer’s day.

You can see more photographs of this amazing friendship on Cameron Bloom’s Instagram feed.

Quiz: Can You Name All 15 of These Big Cat and Wild Cat Species?

Sunday, 22 March 2015

Most of us know a lion or a tiger when we see one but some of the other big cats can be a little more difficult to name.  Throw in a number of wild cat species and it becomes more difficult to name them all.  Just how many of these amazing animals can you name here?  The quiz is multiple choice so you do have some chance at least so why not give it a go?

If the answer you choose goes GREEN, then you got it right.  If it goes RED then you got it wrong.  You will also see how many others chose the different answers (in terms of a percentage).



Would you like to do another quiz?
If this quiz has left you thirsty to test your general knowledge a little more then why not try our endangered mammals quiz?

Click on the picture on the left or HERE to go and do the quiz.  Good luck!

Image Credits
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Watch an Amazing Murmuration of Starlings

Tuesday, 17 February 2015


It’s a great word, isn’t it, murmuration? Whoever invented it to describe a huge gathering of starlings needs a special medal for eccentrically but lovingly mauling the English language.  No one really knows why starlings do this. Some say it is for protection, others to indicate a roost is nearby.  Or maybe it’s just because they can. This staggering murmuration was captured in Brighton (UK) by the film making partnership of Sim Warren and Mia Xerri, The Contrast Collective.

Dragonfly Delight: A Life Cycle in Superb Macrophotography

The sight of a dragonfly on the wing is one of the more remarkable that nature has to offer. Here, with the help of some astounding macrophotography, we take a look at the life cycle of the dragonfly as well as its remarkable and unusual physiology.

The gorgeous colors of a dragonfly – these majestic insects of the air, have been a source of inspiration – and fear – to people for thousands of years. The order to which they belong is called Odonata. Many people regularly go ‘oding’ just as others go birding or butterfly collecting. Their life is cycle as unusual as their looks are striking.

Laundry Basket Cat

Sunday, 11 January 2015


If you never quite seem to get your aim right when throwing things in to your laundry basket then this might be the solution.  Get yourself a cat like this one.  Simply place cat in laundry basket and then begin to throw your clothes. 

Laundry Basket Cat will ensure their safe arrival at their final pre-wash destination by leaping out and retrieving your errant (and flying) socks, shirts and sundries.  Cat-tastic!

Sticky: The Fascinating Story of How the Lord Howe Island Stick Insect was Saved from Extinction


Can you bring a species back from extinction? Despite fictional accounts in books and movies like Jurassic Park the answer remains a very definite no – not in any complete way for sure.  Yet species on the edge of destruction can be saved even if they are dodging extinction in the most unlikely of places.

This is the story of the rediscovery of the Lord Howe Stick Insect (Dryococelus australis) which had also been known as the tree lobster due to its size and color at maturity.  It was thought to have been made extinct by 1920 – game over.  Yet Lord Howe Island has an islet – a sea stack – called Ball’s Pyramid.  It had been suggested that the insect may have survived there, although most thought that highly improbable.

However an Australian team of etymologists journeyed to the islet in 1981 and the rest as they say is history.  Instead of telling you the whole story here, however, watch this beautifully made animation by Jilli Rose which tells the whole story.  It is without words for the first few minutes but after that the oral history of the Lord Howe Stick Insect and how it was saved from almost inevitable stochastic extinction. 

Don’t be put off by its length either – this is entrancing viewing.

The Oldest Species on Earth – The Horseshoe Shrimp

Saturday, 10 January 2015

It was almost bound to be small and seemingly insignificant but the oldest species of earth is a shrimp, ironic given the connotations of its name in the English language.  Rather than being the runt, the squirt and the general nobody its name implies, this little guy (the Horseshoe shrimp to friends but Triops cancriformis rather more formally) has staying power.  It is almost the same now as it was two hundred million years ago.

So, this little chap wasn’t just around when dinosaurs roamed the earth, it was around when they were evolving.  Now researchers from the University of Glasgow in Scotland have discovered two hitherto undiscovered colonies of the rare shrimp.  And they did so in quite an unusual manner.

Watch the Beautiful Hoopoe in Slow Motion Flight


The hoopoe is a beautiful, exotic looking bird which is found across three continents.  It is distinctive to say the very least – a pair of striking black and white wings, a long and elegant beak and a pink-brown body topped with a magnificent crest.  This lovely clip from The Life of Trees by Polish wildlife filmmaker Artur Homan catches this magnificent creature in slow motion flight – and it will take your breath away.

The Hidden Life in Pond Water


Although we bring you footage of strange creatures from the deepest oceans, here is proof that you don’t have to go very far to experience the truly bizarre.  Filmed by Daniel Stoupin, you will see a variety of strange and bewildering creatures in the local pond.  Experience a new universe of water fleas, bryozoans, water mites, mayfly nymphs, ostracods, and, of course, hydras. They jump, crawl, and float in a completely alien environment filled with mesmerizing algae and bushes of ciliates on stalks.

The Boreal Caribou of British Columbia


The number of caribou in British Columbia is shrinking and as this happens both the ecology and local human culture changes.

This fascinating short film shows us some of the issues they face as well as the attempts by wildlife biologists to help sustain this species, truly one of Canada’s iconographic animals. It was commissioned by the 14th North American Caribou Workshop hosted in Fort St John, British Columbia in September 2012.

King Penguin Crèche - The Biggest Day Care Facility on the Planet

Sunday, 21 December 2014

If you have children you will no doubt have experienced the heart stopping moment when you realize the little one has wandered off and you cannot see them anywhere. You might imagine, then, how the average King Penguin parent might feel when they return to feed their chick. Yet it is all part of the King Penguin’s master plan for the survival of the next generation.

Why Cats Like Boxes So Much

Saturday, 13 December 2014

Cats like to hide.  That is because they employ something called crypsis to keep themselves safe and sound.  A cryptic animal, like a cat, uses its anatomy and behavior to hide from anything which might predate them. It is different from camouflage as this can also be employed by predators and is used by many animals, including big cats, to more effectively attack prey.  A house cat uses its natural flexibility to hide in places a predator might not consider. A box is just that. Inside it, a cat feels invisible, and that is exactly how he likes to feel.

Perhaps these exceptions don't quite prove the rule, but let's go with it.

Damselflies – The Killer Lips


Get up close and personal with the damselfly, thanks to director Hasan Samur.  Here he reveals that far from being identical, each damselfly has its own unique colorings and patterns – and they are striking to say the very least. Many carry the scars of battle – some blind, some missing legs. We also get to see some remarkable footage of damselflies mating which to our eyes may seem very strange behavior indeed.

Gorillas in the Crossfire


Andre Bauma works with orphaned gorillas in the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Since the outbreak of civil war in 1996 the gorillas have been caught not in the mist but the crossfire.  The human cost is also staggering with 150 park rangers murdered trying to protect them. However, this vital job is carried on by a brave few as only about 800 gorillas survive in the wild. Created by Orlando Von Einsiedel of the New York Times, this moving video follows Andre and his group of orphans as they struggle through daily life in the Congo.

Watch Amazing Drone Footage of Humpback Whales Bubble Feeding


If you don’t have nets to use then you can always make your own.  This is what humpback whales do when they sense an opportunity to enjoy a feast and this behavior is only seen in Southeast Alaska where this rare and remarkable footage was taken by AkXpro Productions.  Other whales do use bubble feeding but this method is unique to the Alaskan whales. Anywhere from four to twenty whales will join in with the hunt.  One will release a ring of bubbles from its blowhole beneath the herring.  This curtain of bubbles acts as a wall which keeps the fish inside it.  Then another whale will produce vocalizations (which we can’t hear in this video, of course!) which makes the herring squeeze together in tight balls.

Then the whales lunge in unison.  Breaking the surface simultaneously with their mouths wide open, then roll over and down.  This captures as many fish as possible as well as forcing the water they take in out through their baleen plates.  With the water forced out they can then gulp down their prey.  Altogether, pretty amazing!

Dogs on Ice

Saturday, 6 December 2014

Dogs like nothing better than when something a little out of the ordinary happens. So, when the world has turned white one morning and the water has gone hard and slippery, you can’t blame a dog for getting a little excited, can you?

At first you might be a little unsteady on your paws but when there is a new and interesting experience to be had then a few slips and slides hardly matter.

Amung Feedjit